Thursday Movie Picks: Speech/Soliloquy/Monologue

I was going to come up with some witty, drawn out speech to fit the theme, but it wouldn't really fit my rambling theme here now, would it? This week's theme at Wandering Through the Shelves we're talking about films with a famous monologues. Here are the first three that came to mind.

1) Call Me By Your Name

Of course I'm kicking things off with this recent Oscar nominee. Michael Stuhlbarg's monologue at the end of the film when he's trying to ease his son's broken heart was beautiful. He's a parent that is so understanding he's making the rest of us question ourselves. 

2) Doubt

Doubt is a movie I haven't thought about in a while, so it surprised me a bit when it came to mind so quickly. Viola Davis is in this movie for about 10 minutes total, but her plea to Meryl Streep over her son is extraordinary. This film has plenty of memorable speeches. On top of Viola's, there's Meryl's final "I have doubts" words that stay with you even after you leave. 

3) Pulp Fiction

A speech so famous that it's responsible for nearly everyone misquoting the Bible. I'm talking about Jules of course. English motherfucker, do you speak it?

19 comments:

  1. I can't believe I didn't think of Call Me By Your Name. That monologue was the best part of the film! Pulp Fiction ♥

    ReplyDelete
  2. Well I detest Pulp Fiction but that speech fits the theme extremely well.

    I didn't dislike Doubt but I didn't like it all that much either but Viola Davis breezed right in and stole every second she was on the screen.

    I did like Call Me by Your Name though it wasn't the galvanizing experience some had told me to expect. The father's speech was beautiful though.

    I couldn't use the first film that came to mind-Rodgers & Hammerstein's Carousel with the amazing Soliloquy-which just seemed so perfect but I've used it before, darn it. But I did come up with three more pretty easily.

    Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939)-Idealistic greenhorn Jefferson Smith (Jimmy Stewart) is selected by the political machine of his state to complete the term of a recently deceased senator. Arriving full of purpose and dreams of justice the bumpkin is taken under the wing of an esteemed but secretly crooked senior senator (Claude Rains) and guided by the at first cynical and doubtful reporter Diz Moore (Thomas Mitchell) and Smith’s secretary Clarissa Saunders (Jean Arthur). Won over by his honesty the pair try and help him when his awareness of the breathe of malfeasance in government threatens to crush his spirit. Attempting to right many wrongs this climaxes in a memorable filibuster.

    Kramer vs. Kramer (1979)-Ted and Joanna Kramer (Dustin Hoffman & Meryl Streep) are in a failing marriage. Feeling suffocated Joanna leaves not only Ted but deserts their young son Billy (Justin Henry) as well to find herself in parts unknown. Up to this point a distracted, obtuse father focused on his career Ted is required to assume all parental responsibilities and forges a strong bond with his young boy. Time passes and Joanna reappears wanting Billy back regardless of the fact that she abandoned him. Ted puts up a fight and in the court case that ensues there are several memorable monologues.

    A Few Good Men (1992)-On the Guantanamo Bay military base two marines perform a Code Red on a fellow marine resulting in his death. Charged and moved to the nation’s capital their case is assigned to hotshot officer Lt. Daniel Kaffee (Tom Cruise). They affirm that they were under orders to perform the act while their superiors Lt. Kendrick (Keifer Sutherland) and Colonel Nathan Jessup (Jack Nicholson) deny any involvement. Moving into the courtroom Kaffee takes drastic measures to uncover the truth leading to many confrontations and an epic showdown monologue.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kramer vs Kramer is on my shortlist for my next Blindspot list, I've heard so many great things. I haven't seen any of these picks though.

      Delete
  3. Other than number 1 - tho to be fair this was this film's best scene - love the choices :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm still annoyed at Stuhlbarg's lack of Oscar nomination.

      Delete
  4. Oh man. I'm getting PUMPED up just reading about these - great picks.

    ReplyDelete
  5. GREAT PICKS. The Stuhlbarg monologue in Call Me By Your Name should have won him the Oscar. And that whole speech is almost verbatim what is in the book. It's unbearably perfect writing, and he performs it SO beautifully.

    I knew everyone would go with Jules's misquoting of Ezekiel from Pulp Fiction! I prefer the gold watch monologue for how crazy it is.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I can't believe Stuhlbarg didn't even get a nomination, yet Richard Jenkins, whom I love, got one for basically doing the bare minimum. Come on. lol

      Delete
  6. Ah, Pulp Fiction... great choice. I haven't seen Doubt but I've been meaning too for years. Call Me By Your Name has just arrived in library as I hope to watch it this month.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope you like CMBYN, I did minus Armie.

      Delete
  7. I still need to see Call Me By Your Name.

    Great speech by Viola Davis in Doubt. There were several in that film even though it didn't quite work for me as a whole.

    And Jules' speech might be the best in cinematic history.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I really want to watch Doubt again now.

      Delete
  8. Haven't seen CMBYN yet, and have zero recollection about Doubt, but you simply can't go wrong with Jules in Pulp Fiction.

    Great picks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Armie sucks in CMBYN but the rest of the movie is so beautiful it almost excuses him. lol

      Delete
  9. I have not seen your first 2 picks yet but I want to. I watched the scene with Viola Davis and this makes me want to see the film even more so. I love Pulp Fiction and that is a great speech

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You should definitely check out Doubt, I think it's something you would enjoy.

      Delete
  10. It's been a while since I have seen Doubt but I really like it when I saw it.

    ReplyDelete

If you're reading this sentence you should probably leave a comment.