Review: Precious



It's stories like this that make me really want to get into social work. How someone could treat a child so horrible is beyond me. This film was out to teach a lesson, and it did.

'Precious' is the name of our title character played by new-comer Gabourey Sidibe. She's a teenager in 1987 Harlem. She's pregnant for the 2nd time by her father. Her mother is both physically and emotionally abusive towards her. She's overweight, insecure and dreams of a better life. She's managed to to get by, but when her school suspends her for her 2nd pregnancy and sends her to 'Each One Teach One', an alternative school that learns her secret of being unable to read or write. She finds a place she can feel comfort, get a better learning experience, and even find love and friendship. Something she's harshly denied at home.

Monique plays Precious's mother Mary, and she really brings out the ugliness in her character. You hate Mary with every bone in your body, it reminded me a lot of Catherine Keener playing real life murder/worst mother ever Gertrude Baniszweski in 'An American Crime'. She brings out the hate, and disappears in her role. There's nothing to like about her, plain and simple she's just nasty. I never thought I'd say this, but Monique gave a fierce performance, and that Oscar is as good as hers already. Other supporting characters include Ms Rain (Paula Patton) Mrs. White (Maraiah Carey) and Lenny Kravitz (Nurse John). Ms. Rain is Precious's teacher who goes above and beyond to help her. She gives a brave, tear-jerking performance. Carey has come along way from 'Glitter', even though her part is small, she's decent. All the student's in Precious's class were great additions as well. All different, with amusing personalities.


Recommended: Yes 5/5 stars

Memorable Quote: "I wish she'd quit this shit" - Precious (Gabourey Sidibe) I choose that quote because it really got to me. What Precious was feeling, and how she deserved more. Brilliant performance by a first time actress.

1 comment:

  1. loved your review of this. it was certainly a powerful film that highlighted an issue that has been shoved under the carpet for far too long.

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