Review: Suffragette

Votes for women!

Maud (Carey Mulligan) never considered herself a Suffragette. She's been working as a washer woman since she was seven. She's married to Sonny (Ben Winshaw) who at the beginning seems like an okay dude. They also have one son. She begins to notice more women joining the movement to secure women's rights to vote and for equal wages. Violet (Anne Marie Duff) catches her attention first, and when she accompanies her to speak, then ends up sharing her own testimony instead, Maud can't ignore it any longer. She's aided by Edith (Helene Bonham Carter) an educated nurse, and seemingly the only woman in this movie without an asshole for a husband. Emily (Natalie Press) and Alice (Romola Garai) round out the rest. 

Carey Mulligan is magnificent in this film. It's a joy to watch her go from this timid woman to one who chooses to stand up, just a little more each time to fight for her rights. Even when men like Inspector Steed (Brenden Gleeson) try to silence her. Anne Marie Duff is also wonderful and really should be on the poster over Meryl Streep, who literally has one scene in this entire film. (Though it is a powerful one)

A film like this is so important, and I love the inclusion of a timeline of years when women could vote in various countries that plays right before the credits do. It's sad that things like this are still going on in the world, and even sadder that I still hear some of the arguments the men in this film make today.

The pacing is a bit slow, it plays as if it's a slide show, like it's checking off big events in Muad's life, and that's unfortunate for a film so important. It's a very grey and depressing, but that's exactly what this entire movement was about. These laws were and still are depressing. 

Recommended: Yes

Grade: B

Memorable Quote: "I'm just going to listen." - Maud (Carey Mulligan)

12 comments:

  1. Great review Brittani! :) I thought this was a pretty great movie also, but was disappointed at how brief Streep's role was, especially considering she was plastered all over the posters.

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    1. No kidding. I figured we'd see her again after that. Nope. lol Poor Anne Marie Duff, she should've been on the poster.

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  2. I do want to see this film because it is important. What a shame this still happens and that many men, right in our own backdoor, still have the same thoughts from 100 years ago

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    1. I know, It's gross and I'm glad the men in my life. My husband, dad, and friends don't think like that.

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    1. I'll he shocked if she doesn't get her 2nd Oscar nom out of this.

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  4. Great review! This looks like an Oscar bait to me, but hopefully it's one of the good ones like King's Speech and Imitation Game

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    1. I wasn't crazy about the King's Speech, but it has a similar tone. I think it will be a contender for Mulligan for sure.

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  5. Isn't it crazy how this only happened in the 20th century? And even crazier that it still feels relevant? I agree this wasn't a super great movie but also agree that Carey Mulligan carried it, and I'm glad I saw it.

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    1. Same. I'm very glad I went to see this movie. I can't help but feel an enormous amount of gratefulness for the women who fought for this. Even though gender bias still exists, we have it easy compared to them.

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  6. It really is an important film, and Mulligan is terrific. It could've been better, but I'd give it a B-.

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    1. It's a shame Mulligan was completely forgotten during awards season because this is one of her better performances.

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No seriously, post one. I need attention.